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DIDACTIC TABLE OF
‘UNDER SIEGE’

PLOT
When a boy called Robert asks a genie to grant his siblings a wish for a day, he finds himself in a medieval scenario, first outside and then inside a castle under siege. After he meets the knights besieging the castle, he is reunited with his siblings, with whom he has to defend the castle from the attack of the knights and their army. At dusk, just when the castle is about to be overrun, the magic is gone, and Robert and his siblings find themselves safe in their bedroom.

DIDACTIC POTENTIAL (AT LANGUAGE LEVEL)
This story includes many terms related to medieval times (weapons and armour) and medieval constructions (castles), as well as some archaic words and expressions. A number of these items derive from old, middle and modern French. Thus, this tale is adequate to work on the evolution of the English language and on the influences that languages have had over time, mostly depending on the political/sociological prevalence of one country over others in a given period of History. These words have all been defined in the text: genie / grant / dare / sibling / bastion / arrow slits / keep / moat / drawbridge / orchard / crowd / under siege / helmet / hearty / lad / fellow / armour / shield / spear / colt / paladin / royal escort / mismatch / garments / carry out / wander / distressed / courtesy / fortress / conquer / refuse / ashamed / deprive someone of his liberty / do no harm / boldness / beg / dizzy / tree trunk / besieger / pour / herald / vigorous / spurs / cautiously / artefact / bolt / window ledge / it's a pity / machicolations / spill.

DIDACTIC POTENTIAL (OTHER COMPETENCES)
This story has several references to medieval times and concepts (castles, weapons), wars (including the Independence War, sieges, attacks, etc.) and Spanish kings (e.g., the Catholic Monarchs). Therefore, it is suitable for working in collaboration with the History subject.

LIMITATIONS & POTENTIAL DIFFICULTIES
Conceptually, this is a rather simple story. However, some of the vocabulary specific to medieval times can be unfamiliar for today’s readers. Moreover, there are a few long and complex structures that are common in B1. In that sense, the definitions provided for a considerable number of words and expressions of the story may prove useful both to enjoy the reading and also from a didactic perspective.

PROPOSALS FOR WORKING WITH THE STORY IN CLASSROOM & AT HOME
There is a balance between activities to be carried out at home or collaboratively in class. Others could be undertaken partly at home (e.g., thinking of examples, arguments or justifications; etc.) and then shared in small groups or with the whole classroom. The story provides a good opportunity for a classroom discussion on values, particularly, to bring up the subjects of wars and/or political independence. In that sense, it could be of interest to see the reasons underlying different past and present wars, their immediate implications and their middle-term consequences. Also a discussion comparing the different ways of living in medieval versus modern times, such as social hierarchy, lifestyle, or the technology available, could be undertaken in the context ofworking with this tale.

SUGGESTIONS FOR BRAINSTORMING OR PRE-TASKS
There are several themes that arise in this story that could serve for a pre-task. Possible pre-tasks could be thinking/discussing about: -Fantasy vs. reality. How would you react if you found yourself in an unfamiliar setting and you were told that you were under a spell? -Life in the Middle Ages. How did people use to live in medieval times? What professions or occupations did they use to have? What types of comforts and discomforts did they have? -Violence. What would you have done if you had been born in times where certain forms of physical violence was considered normal and acceptable? Where would you draw the line? How would you try and convince your fellow citizens to reject excessive violence and privilege?

SUGGESTIONS FOR WORKING ON RELATED FIELDS & STORIES
As proposed in a previous tale, an obvious parallel is to Aladdin, from the book of One Thousand and One Nights. The children could be asked to compare Calleja’s Genie of the Sand with Aladdin’s Genie of the Lamp as a closing activity. Another possible post-task is comparing this story with the one depicted in a book or a film with a similar plot, such as Mark Twain’s ‘A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court’ (or a recent Disney film version of it named ‘A Kid in King Arthur's Court’). Besides, as mentioned above, this story is suitable for addressing themes directly related to old History. It could be interesting to ask the History teacher for support and collaboration so that the content of the corresponding annotations is properly explained and analysed in the History class.

TABLA DIDÁCTICA DEL CUENTO
“EN ESTADO DE SITIO”

RESUMEN
Este cuento es una adaptación resumida de dos cuentos de Edith Nesbit titulados “A castle and no dinner” y “A siege and bed”, de la colección de cuentos Five Children and It). Se trata de la continuación de “¡A volar todos!”, de donde viene su castigo. El genio ha convertido, a petición de los hermanos, su casa en un castillo. Pero se encuentra asediado por el ejército de Wulfrico de Talbot y los cuatro hermanos tienen que defenderlo.

POTENCIAL DIDÁCTICO
Este cuento permite observar de nuevo cómo se describen los géneros de diferente manera. Especialmente Juana es muy pasiva, tiene miedo y quiere rendirse. Desde el punto de vista del lenguaje, es un cuento muy útil para ampliar el vocabulario y comentar los cambios en la forma de hablar a lo largo de las distintas épocas.

PROPUESTA DE ACTIVIDADES
Actividades lúdicas de vocabulario. Actividades relacionadas con la historia de España. Actividades creativas para escribir y debatir.

VOCABULARIO
Definición de las siguientes expresiones, palabras o grafías: baluarte, saeteras, foso, puente levadizo, torre del homenaje, paladín, gualdrapas, penachos, heraldo, ¿de dó vienes?, por mi santiguada, empresa, osar, guillarse, vahído, heraldo, rendir el castillo, merced.

Text, intertextuality and context: Activity to scaffold reading comprehension and notes on intertextual and historical or cultural contextual information.
Oral interpersonal communication: Activity to improve oral production and interaction.
Collaboration: Activity to be undertaken totally or partially in a group.
Critical capacity: Activity to promote explicit learning through analysis and critical reasoning.
Oral comprehension: Activity for the acquisition of oral receptive skills.
Gamification and digital skills: Activity to promote gamified and technology-based learning through exercises and small interactive games with the computer.
Oral interpersonal communication: Activity to improve oral production and interaction.
Didactic guidelines for the English teacher: Table with a summary of the story and recommendations for the use of the tool in the classroom.
Audio: Listening of the enriched audio embedded in each page.
Comprensión lectora y contexto Explicación de información contextual, histórica o cultural, difícil para el lector actual.

Creatividad Propuestas para trabajar la imaginación, la fantasía y la sensibilidad a partir de la lectura.

Trabajo colaborativo y emocional Propuestas de actividades para desarrollar el trabajo en grupo y el conocimiento de las emociones.

Capacidad crítica e intertextualidad Anotaciones que promueven el pensamiento crítico y la profundización en el conocimiento de las estrategias literarias.

Actividades auditivas Anotaciones orientadas a desarrollar la recepción auditiva, utilizando la dimensión oral del lenguaje, los sonidos y la música.

Elementos interactivos (Puzles, galerías de imágenes, ejercicios, etc.) Anotaciones que han requerido algún tipo de programación especial orientadas a fomentar la lectura activa.

Audio Pista de audio del cuento por página.

Robert wants to go back home but Wulfric of Talbot doesn't allow him to leave. Working with a partner, imagine, write and perform a short play scene about the discussion between these characters. One of you will be Wulfric of Talbot and the other will be Robert.

Follow the basic norms, such as using square brackets for additional information on the setting, the characters' gestures, etc. Then, use a new line every time a character intervenes. Look at the following example:

[W.of T. sits down angrily staring at R.]

W. of T.: Tell me who you are and don't abuse my patience! R.: Sir, please, have mercy, I can't tell you because you would not believe me.

Una ciudad de libros

Comprensión lectora y contexto Explicación de información contextual, histórica o cultural, difícil para el lector actual.
Creatividad Propuestas para trabajar la creatividad a partir de la lectura.
Trabajo colaborativo y emocional Propuestas de actividades para desarrollar el trabajo en grupo y el conocimiento de las emociones.
Capacidad crítica e intertextualidad Anotaciones que promueven el pensamiento crítico y la profundización en el conocimiento de las estrategias literarias
Comprensión sonora Ejercicios que trabajan la comprensión auditiva (para la versión en inglés).
Elementos interactivos (Puzles, galerías de imágenes, ejercicios, etc.) Anotaciones que han requerido algún tipo de programación especial
Icono audio Se utiliza este icono para escuchar el audio incrustado por página en la versión en inglés y en la bilingüe.

En estado de sitio

Este relato es una adaptación resumida de dos cuentos de la autora inglesa Edith Nesbit titulados “A castle and no dinner” y “A siege and bed”, de la colección de cuentos Five Children and It, ilustrado por H.R. Millar y publicada en el Reino Unido en 1902. Se trata de la continuación de “¡A volar todos!”, en el que, al final, los padres de los hermanos los castigan sin salir al día siguiente de casa.

Ilustración del cuento original de Nesbit por H. R. Millar.


The English version of this book is a translation from Plaga de Dragones, a story collection which was published by Saturnino Calleja in 1923. This translation was undertaken collaboratively as part of a crowd translation project which took place at the Spanish distance learning university UNED in 2016, involving translation teachers and students. During the translation process, we tried to reach a balance between being faithful to the Spanish text and bringing it into the 21st century for the enjoyment and learning of modern readers. We feel that the stories are still relevant to you these days and trust that you will find the cultural contrast interesting.

The text has been enriched with a number of annotations including audio, term explanations, and various proposals for activities, which are mainly aimed at young non-native English speakers.

Partes del castillo

Coloca cada palabra en el número que corresponda con la parte del castillo:

Ilustración de Olivia Goicoechea.

Measles

A contagious illness that causes red spots on the skin and high temperature. Children have it more frequently than adults unless they are vaccinated.

Example: Tommy didn’t go to school when he had measles.

Bean

The seed of certain plants which are eaten as a vegetable in stews, soups, salads, or as a side dish.

Example: The smell of the bean stew was delicious.

Nanny

A person who provides care for somebody else’s children as a paid service.

Example: The nanny told the children a story at bedtime.

Three Wise Men

According to the Christian tradition, the Three Wise Men, Kings or Magi were distinguished foreigners who visited Jesus after his birth, guided by a star, bearing gifts. They are common figures in Christmas nativity sets, next to the Holy Family and the shepherds.

Example: The names of the Three Wise Men were Melchior, Gaspar and Balthassar.

Bureau

A chest or piece of furniture for writing with drawers (boxes that slide in and out and are used to hold things). It can have a top that locks with a key and opens upwards.

Example: The old wooden bureau contained old secret documents.

Flock

A group of sheep, goats, or birds.

Example: Shepherds take care of their flock.

Benny_Trapp_Anatololacerta_oertzeni_Rhodos.jpg


Why do you think that Rosie and Fabian’s mother doesn’t let them open the two drawers? Try and guess the reason!


We are sure that you know what a bureau is and what it is for. Can you name up to five things that you would typically find in the drawers of a bureau and five things that you would never ever find there?


In the text we can read about the different parts of a castle. Would you be able to locate them in the image below?



We are sure that you know what a bureau is and what it is for. Can you name up to five things that you would typically find in the drawers of a bureau and five things that you would never ever find there?


We are sure that you know what a bureau is and what it is for. Can you name up to five things that you would typically find in the drawers of a bureau and five things that you would never ever find there?

Robert wants to go "back home anxiously". Can you guess why he is so keen to go back home?

ANSWER:

Robert thinks that they have "really done it his time". Do you know what he means?

ANSWER:


The Captain is wearing an armour with pieces from different ages. In the movie "Time Bandits" (1981), the main characters have the ability to travel in time and they wear clothes from different ages.

Watch the video if you can and try to identify as many clothes from different ages as you can. Once you are done, share them with your partners.

As we can read in the text, the soldier falls down making a "splash sound". This is an example of an onomatopoeia, that is, the effect of a word whose pronunciation is similar to the very sound it refers to.

Listen to the way it is pronounced by the narrator and try to remember the sound of a person’s body splashing on the water of a pool before swimming. They sound alike, don’t they? Together with the rest of your group think of as many onomatopoeic words as you can: "knock", "tic-tac", etc.

During sieges, defenders try to protect their castle or city with all the weapons they have. Some common weapons to defend a castle are big cauldrons filled with boiling oil or water that is poured over the attackers. Very nasty indeed!

On the side of the attackers, one of the most common weapons to siege a castle is the battering ram. This big object has to be dragged to the castle's door to knock it over and has a kind of roof to protect soldiers from whatever could be thrown on them from the castle.

In modern days, siege weapons have evolved a lot. Here you can see a Mörser Gerät, a weapon used by the German army during World War II. Can you imagine how it works?

ANSWER:

"An argument that was about to start". Can you guess what this argument would have been? Can you find any evidence in the text that supports your guess?

The four siblings are yelling to the soldiers that are attacking them. Do you know why they are shouting?

ANSWER:

Think of the sentence: “Somebody goes into the garden and gets a jug of water spilled over them”: Who got the jug of water and who did s/he spill it over? Why would s/he do that? Why is Martha upset?

Think of the sentence: “Somebody goes into the garden and gets a jug of water spilled over them”: Who got the jug of water and who did s/he spill it over? Why would s/he do that? Why is Martha upset?


Now that you have read the whole story, try to guess the correct order of the following images to match the chain of events that make it up:

Collect and share information about snakes. First, try to make an effort and focus on what you already know. Try to remember what they eat, how they reproduce, etc. Then, you can look for more data in your Natural Science' books or the Internet if you need to

Afterwards, try to organize the information you have found out about their life (what they eat, how they reproduce, etc.) and summarize it in a paragraph or in a few PowerPoint slides.


As expected, Wulfric doesn't believe Robert when he tells him that they are all part of a genie's wish.

Now, imagine that Joachim comes back to Wulfric and tells him that Robert was right, because he just saw how the genie made Robert disappear. What do you think Wulfric would do if he knew that they are in the "future"? Would he get angry and attack Joachim and Robert? Would he leave his arms, adapt to the new environment and enjoy the pleasures of modern times? Would he get depressed because he and his men are fictional beings?

Think about it and defend your position in front of the group.

The historical novel is a literary genre that developed during the 19th century. It is based on the recreation of the life of historical characters in their own time and place. The founder of this genre was Sir Walter Scott (1771-1832) who wrote about the past of Scotland.

¡Por mi santiguada!

A estas alturas del cuento, te habrá pasado lo mismo que a Roberto y habrás pensado “¡pero qué palabras más raras dicen los hombres de armadura!”. Efectivamente, en nuestra época no forman parte del vocabulario común, sino que parecen sacadas de una novela histórica. “¡Por mi santiguada!” era una expresión o frase hecha que denotaba sorpresa en quien la decía. Es sinónimo de otras expresiones antiguas, como “¡pardiez!” o “¡por mi fe!”, que hacen referencia a la misma sensación de asombro. Un “gallardo mozuelo” es un niño que parece fuerte y valiente. El adjetivo “gallardo” también se utilizaba mucho antiguamente, durante la Edad Media, ¡pero no dejó de usarse hasta bien entrado el siglo XX! El español ha cambiado tanto desde entonces…

¿Conoces algún refrán, palabra o frase que te recuerde a otra época o que utilices todavía hoy? Pregúntale a tus abuelos, a tus padres o a tus amigos. También puedes buscar información en Internet.

Ilustración del cuento original, H.R. Millar, «Robert was dragged forthwith—by the reluctant ear», 1902.

Gualdrapas y penachos

Seguro que has visto alguna vez dibujos o películas en las que aparecen caballeros (también llamados “paladines”) medievales. Su forma de vestir, con imponentes armaduras, es espectacular. ¿Pero te habías fijado en que sus caballos también aparecen, a veces, con una indumentaria propia? En el cuento, se nos describe al potro del Capitán ataviado con “gualdrapas y penachos de muchos colores”. ¿Puedes imaginarlo? Observa la imagen y piensa en la definición de “gualdrapa” y de “penacho”, fijándote en el caballo. Luego, revisa que tu respuesta haya sido la correcta.

¿Acertaste?

¡Menudas historias!

A estas alturas del cuento, te habrás percatado de que Roberto ha realizado una especie de viaje en el tiempo. Cuando conoce al Capitán, su armadura está compuesta de piezas de muchas épocas distintas. ¿Las conoces todas? Une cada letrero con su imagen correspondiente.

Reyes Católicos (siglo XV y principios del XVI).

Guerra de Independencia (1808-1814).

Escolta Real
(primera mitad del siglo XX).

¿De dó vienes?

En esta parte de la historia, el Capitán le pregunta a Roberto (en su jerga medieval, por supuesto) de dónde viene y cuál es su propósito. Sí que hablaban raro estos caballeros…

Empresa

Con esta palabra, el Capitán no quiere referirse a un negocio, sino que lo utiliza como sinónimo de “propósito” u “objetivo”. Es decir, cuáles son los motivos que han llevado a Roberto hasta su campamento.

Lágrima varonil


En el texto, el autor remarca que el llanto del Capitán es “varonil”, es decir, propio de “varones” u hombres. De hecho, fíjate en que el caballero derrama solo una lágrima. ¿Por qué crees que el autor ha querido centrarse en ese detalle? ¿Piensas que una lágrima femenina es distinta? Observa la imagen: ambos personajes están pasando por un mal momento, pero ¿cuál de los dos es el que muestra su desconsolación a través del llanto?

Para ayudarte a responder, reflexiona acerca de tus propias experiencias o de anécdotas que conozcas: ¿es lo mismo cuando llora un niño que una niña? ¿Lo hacen igual? ¿Qué dicen u opinan los demás sobre que los niños lloren? Comparte tus pensamientos con tus compañeros o con tu familia.

Ilustración de «Entre juguetes», novela de magia por entregas. Los Muchachos, 25 de abril de 1920, Madrid.

Osar

Aunque no lo parezca, esta palabra no tiene nada que ver con la hembra del oso. Se trata de la segunda persona del singular del presente de indicativo del verbo “osar”, que se usaba muchísimo en la Edad Media. Es sinónimo de “atreverse” a hacer o decir algo determinado, con cierto tono negativo. Es decir, que su uso tenía cierto matiz negativo, y expresaba la ofensa o sorpresa de quienes lo utilizaban.

Guillarse

Con este verbo, Roberto quiere referirse a que Wulfrico de Talbot utiliza su llegada como excusa para huir del campo de batalla. “Guillárselas” es sinónimo, entonces, de “huir” o “marcharse”. Por eso el caballero le responde al niño que es osado con sus palabras. Ya hemos visto, en una nota anterior, lo que significa el verbo “osar”. Revísala si no te acuerdas y sigue leyendo.

Interjecciones

Wulfrico de Talbot le dice a Jaquín, uno de sus compañeros, que acompañe a Roberto de regreso a casa. Para animarlo, y que se marchen rápidamente, el caballero utiliza la expresión “¡Sus!”, que es parecido a decir: “¡venga!” o “¡vamos!”. Este tipo de exclamaciones o de dichos se llaman interjecciones. Se utilizan para expresar ciertos sentimientos o para llamar la atención de las personas. Expresiones como “¡bah!”, “¡bravo!” o “¡uf!” son interjecciones. ¿Conoces algún otro ejemplo de interjecciones? ¡Ten cuidado y no las confundas con onomatopeyas!

Ilustración de El guerrero del Antifaz, nº 508-517. ©Copyright Mariano Bayona Estradera - 2019

Vahído

Para regresar con sus hermanos, Roberto le pide al Enarenado su ayuda. Este hace uso de su magia y, debido a los efectos del hechizo, el niño sufre un “vahído”, es decir, un pequeño mareo o confusión, antes de aparecer en el interior del castillo.

En el fragor de la batalla

Para ayudarte, puedes escuchar aquí algunos objetos comunes en esas batallas

Heraldo

Antiguamente, los heraldos eran los mensajeros.

Mensajero. Royal 10 E IV, fol. 3v. The British Library online, Catalogue of Illuminated Manuscripts.

Rendir el castillo

El heraldo hace llegar un mensaje de advertencia a los hermanos. Con “intimar” no se refiere a que desean pactar una tregua, sino a una exigencia. Es decir, se dirigen a los niños con el propósito de ordenar que se rindan. Si estos no aceptan, serán condenados a una “pena” o castigo: ser “pasados a sangre y fuego” (darles muerte) en una fiera batalla. ¿Qué habrías hecho tú? Piénsalo y descubre cómo actúan Roberto y sus hermanos.

Merced

“Merced” era una palabra muy utilizaba en la Edad Media. En este caso, se combina con la preposición “a” para crear una expresión (“merced a algo”) que significa “gracias a”. En el cuento, por tanto, Jaquín se inclinaba sobre el artificio gracias al cual se bajaba el puente levadizo del castillo.

Cuestión de valentía

¿Notas alguna diferencia en el comportamiento de los hermanos? Antera y Juana parecen tener una actitud distinta a la de Roberto y Cirilo. ¿Por qué crees que las niñas tienen miedo de dañar a alguien y proponen rendirse? ¿Las niñas siempre son más asustadizas que los niños? Reflexiona sobre ello. Puedes comentar tus opiniones con compañeros o familiares.

Doña Inés de Suarez en la defensa de la ciudad de Santiago, por José Mercedes Ortega (1856-1933).

Defendiendo el castillo

Ya has leído cómo se defienden los hermanos del asalto de sus enemigos, comandados por el caballero Wulfrico de Talbot. ¿Te ha gustado su estrategia? Imagina que te encuentras en su situación: ¿cómo habrías defendido el castillo? Escríbelo y, si así lo deseas, comparte tu idea con otras personas.


Ilustración del cuento original, H.R. Millar, «Anthea titled the pot over the nearest lead-hole», 1902.

Sifón

El sifón es una botella de un litro que muchas veces contenía una especie de gaseosa.

Unísono

Hablar – o aquí gritar – al unísono quiere decir que todos gritan lo mismo a la vez.

Sacristán

El sacristán es la persona que ayuda al cura, y se encarga de cuidar y limpiar la iglesia.

Los transportes

Se da por sabido que lo que le pide el cura al sacristán es que enganche el caballo al carro para llevar a los niños a casa. Actualmente, uno de los mayores problemas de las grandes ciudades es la cantidad de coches que hay en ellas. ¡Es difícil aparcar y hay grandes atascos! Casi todas las familias ahora tienen un coche para desplazarse pero antiguamente había muy pocos coches y antes aún, no había automóviles, sino coches tirados por caballos. Investiga en Internet y coméntalo con tus abuelos u otras personas mayores ¿Ellos tenían coche? ¿Cómo se desplazaban cuando eran jóvenes?

Intenta conectar los siguientes vehículos con su año de invención, ¡a ver si lo consigues!

Ilustración de sir John Tenniel (1820-1914), para la novela original de Alicia en el País de las Maravillas (1865), de Lewis Carroll.

El sueño del vuelo

¿Has soñado alguna vez con volar? ¿Cómo fue la sensación en tu sueño?
Y si no lo has soñado nunca, ¿cómo te lo imaginas? ¡Dibuja tu sueño o el vuelo más alocado y mágico que te imagines!

El final del cuento

¿Te parece justo para Eufemia y Enrique el final del cuento? Piensa sobre por qué los adultos no agradecen a los niños su hazaña e imagina un final diferente para el cuento. Puedes poner por escrito ese final aquí.

Juguetes

¿Cómo eran los juguetes de tus padres y abuelos? Pregúntales si tuvieron algunos de estos.

Issues

Something that is made, sent out, or published.

Example: The man sold all his old issues of comics from when he was a child.

Why does Robert say this?

“Wulfric of Talbot would be ashamed and consider it useless to deprive someone of his liberty, someone who has done no harm and only wants to be gone as soon as possible, in other words, to clear off.”

ANSWER:

Council

Imagine you and your partners are members of the city Council during the plague of dragons in the story. Each one of you must choose a role from the following list and start a discussion:

  1. Mayor: S/he wants to eliminate he plague but without harming anybody and without destroying any buildings or property.
  2. Militar advisor: S/he wants to eliminate the plague no matter what to ensure that the main objective is reached.
  3. Scientific advisor: S/he doesn't want to eliminate the plague in order study the dragons and protect the people at the same time.

Rosie and Fabian use a six-sided puzzle to make a castle. Each side contains a beautiful picture. Go to the webpage of a famous museum and select six paintings that you like, each one corresponding to the following famous painters:

  1. Leonardo da Vinci (Italian, 15th century)
  2. Peter Paul Rubens (German, 17th century)
  3. Rembrandt van Rijn (Dutch, 17th century)
  4. Vincent Van Gogh (Dutch, 19th century)
  5. Pablo Picasso (Spanish, 20th century)
  6. Salvador Dali (Spanish, 20th century)

Bayonet

A weapon that consists of a knife attached to the front end of a rifle.

Example: Bayonets were used in close fighting long ago.

Sabre

A heavy sword with one sharp curved edge.

Example: My grandfather has a sabre on the wall from the Mexican war.


Do you think this is a reasonable way to defend a castle? Is this decision safe enough? Wouldn’t it be better to fight Joachim so that he cannot lower the drawbridge?


Is this the most interesting part in your opinion? If the granted wish had not ended at this point, the attack would probably have finished quite differently. Think of a likely ending to the story if the spell had continued and share it with your group. Use conditional structures like: "If the spell hadn't finished, ...".

Fire poker

A pointed metal bar for stirring up a fire.

Example: Our father used the fire poker when the grill was about to extinguish.

Board

A plank; a flat, cut piece of wood.

Example: The child fixed small wheels to the board and then jumped on it.

Alquicel

Alquicel: Es una palabra que viene del árabe y se refiere a un tipo de vestidura a modo de capa, que normalmente era blanca y de lana.

Si quieres conocer qué otras palabras son de origen árabe, utiliza el diccionario e investiga: ¿Son de origen árabe estas palabras: “alcohol”, “almohada”, “aleta”, “alcázar”, “alcaldía”, “alhelí” y “altura”?

Lead

A grey metal which is very heavy.

Example: That shield is made of lead to protect the doctor against radiation.

Harvest

The gathering of ripe crops or plants grown on a farm.

Example: Summer is the time of year when the farmers harvest their wheat.

Rebecca at the well

A story from the Bible which narrates how a woman called Rebecca was chosen to be Isaac’s wife by his father’s servant because she was by a particular well and said and did what he was expecting, which he interpreted to be a sign of God.

Daoiz and Velarde

Two Spanish captains who raised against French Napoleonic occupation and rule, and fought in a famous and decisive battle which took place in Madrid on May 2nd 1808.

By heart

Using the memory.

Example: The child learnt the song by heart for the festival.

Alcubilla

A famous Spanish legal dictionary written by lawyer Marcelo Martínez Alcubilla in the 19th century.

Divine Comedy

A long narrative poem by 14th century Italian author Dante Alighieri. It is considered to be one of the greatest works of world literature.

Pay attention to the way “castle” is pronounced. Is this the way you would have pronounced it if you did not know the word? Maybe not…

There is a silent letter in “castle”. Which one is it? Do you remember any other English words that share this peculiar pronunciation?

ANSWER:

In the story, Robert thinks that he could explain the truth about the Sandy's wishes to Wulfric of Talbot.

The true reason why the children and the soldiers are there is hard to believe. Think of a couple of other justifications that Robert could give Wulfric of Talbot for their presence. Then select the best ones (those that Wulfric would accept).

As we can guess from the reading, Wulfric of Talbot and the other knights were brought by the genie from somewhere else. Could you imagine that place? Which country would that be? Would it be a medieval castle? Maybe they were in the middle of a battlefield?

Write down a composition that contains at least the following:
- Description (of Wulfric of Talbot)
- Biography (his origins and his life)
- Narration (what he was doing when he was abducted by the magician)

Finish your composition with the first words that Wulfric of Talbot says in this story: “Come here, young lad, don’t be afraid”.

La ciudad en la biblioteca, en la ciudad en la biblioteca

Los escritores utilizan muchos trucos para hacer sus historias interesantes. En este caso, la autora hace que los juguetes y los espacios de juego que construyen los niños cobren vida y se hagan reales dentro de la historia. ¿Conoces otros cuentos en los que ocurra hacen algo parecido?

Aquí tienes un ejemplo muy famoso:

El soldadito de plomo

Ran out of

To use up the entire amount of something.

Example: It was such a hot day that we ran out of drinks.

Rivadeneyra

Manuel Rivadeneyra (1805-1872) fue un editor e impresor español que desde 1846 trató de reunir las obras clásicas de la literatura española en una colección que se llamó la Biblioteca de Autores Españoles.

El ratón mecánico

Otro truco para hacer una buena historia es jugar con los narradores y el origen del cuento. Nuestro narrador ha escuchado la historia que acabamos de leer de uno de los personajes del cuento. ¿No es un poco raro? ¿Te fiarías tú de lo que cuente un ratón mecánico?

Inventa una historia con un narrador poco fiable ¡pero divertido!

The wizard is described as a fierce man, but in the book's illustration you can see that he doesn't seem to be too fierce. How do you imagine a man "terrible as a wild beast" and with "three eyes"?

Draw your own version of the fierce wizard of the story. You can add other elements like warts or long hair. Just follow the information in the story and your own imagination!

skating

Make a list of places related to the different types of weather mentioned in this paragraph. For example, you can relate Egypt with the sun and England with the rain. Think of other examples from other continents too.

Working in groups, imagine that, instead of sending medieval warriors to the early 20th century, the genie sends a group of scientists to the future. How would they look like? How would they fit in the new environment?

To organize the task, each member of your group could focus on describing just one scientist, using the following image as a reference.


What a messy situation! It looks like a bloody battle is about to start in the middle of Rosie and Fabian’s library! Luckily, the monkey and the mouse are sensible and have an idea to put a stop to all this nonsense.

How would the monkey or the mouse persuade them not to fight? Elaborate a small speech of reconciliation as one of them. First, write it down and then rehearse it orally.


All throughout this story there are two scenarios: a real one in Rosie and Fabian’s library and an imaginary one in a medieval city which is about to become a battlefield… which is inside the library! Where are the children right now: still in the battlefield or back in the library?

Cloak

A long, loose, outer garment without sleeves that is used as a coat, to protect the wearer from the cold.

Example: The wizard had a purple cloak with stars on it.

Moors

North African Muslims.

Example: In the Middle Ages the Moors introduced many new scientific techniques to Spain and the rest of Europe.

Wheeled Board

A plank with wheels underneath. It can be a skateboard, which is a flat, short, narrow board that has four wheels on the bottom and is used for practising a sport.

Example: It is more fun to stand on your skateboard than to sit on it.

Rivadeneyra

A famous Spanish editor who lived in the 19th century, who published many Spanish works and collections with high quality.

Many stories have doors that will be opened only after performing a spell o a specific task. Can you remember any other stories with a magical door?

ANSWER:

The Captain uses a trumpet to communicate his orders to the soldiers.

Nowadays, soldiers use portable radios to communicate. The first device of this kind, known as "walkie-talkie", was developed during World War II. With time, the "walkie-talkie" evolved into our actual mobile phones.

Can you imagine the advantages and disadvantages of these different ways of communication? Does everybody in your group agree?

What do you think has happened here? How can the shepherd have slept for several months?

ANSWER:


This is the end of the story. Rosie and Fabian are sick in bed. In their feverish sleep, they have a nightmare about being judged in court for having been disobedient and reckless. Distribute the roles at court among the members of your group:

Try to follow the main norms in a real court situation (respect to the magistrates’ indications, turn taking, etc.) and come out with a sentence.

Don’t forget to finish the role play by waking Rosie and Fabian up at the end!

Genie

A spirit with magical powers.

Example: When Aladdin rubbed the lamp, a genie appeared.

Granted (grant)

To agree to give something to someone.

Example: The teacher granted me permission to go to the bathroom.

Dare

To have the courage to do something.

Example: Because I am a bit shy, I did not dare to ask the teacher my question in class, so I waited until after the other students had left.

Siblings

Brothers and/or sisters.

Example: We are a big family; I have five siblings: 2 brothers and 3 sisters.

Bastions

A part of a castle wall that sticks out from it in order to protect it.

Example: In the Middle Ages, archers would shoot arrows in all directions from inside a bastion.

Arrow slits

A thin opening that could be used to shoot arrows through.

Example: There were arrow slits in the walls of the bastion to defend against attackers.

Keep

The main part of the castle inside the walls, usually a big strong tower.

Example: The king lives in the keep.

Moats (moat)

A river or lake that surrounds a castle for security.

Example: To get into the castle, you had to cross the moat by walking across a bridge.

Drawbridge

A bridge over the moat that can be pulled up so that nobody can cross it.

Example: The enemy approaches; pull up the drawbridge!

Orchard

An area where fruit and nut trees (and shrubs or bushes) are intentionally grown.

Example: There is a cherry orchard behind their country house.

Crowd

A large group of people.

Example: The crowd applauded when the singer appeared on stage.

Under siege

Under attack, being attacked.

Example: When the castle is under siege, the soldiers fight to protect it.

Helmets

A hard, metal protection for the head.

Example: The knight was hit on the head, but luckily he was wearing a helmet.

Hearty

Strong and healthy.

Example: This mountain climb is only for hearty people who are in good health.

Lad

A young boy.

Example: When I was a lad, I loved to play outdoors.

Fellow

A man, a guy; a person with a similar position or interests.

Example: He's a jolly good fellow!

Armour

Metal protection that used to cover the body at war.

Example: Knights wore a padded cloak underneath the armour.

Shield

A large piece of metal or wood used by medieval soldiers to protect themselves at war.

Example: The giant broke the lad's shield in two.

Spear

A long stick with a metal point used as a weapon for fighting.

Example: We saw at the museum several spears that were used for hunting, fishing and fighting by many ancient civilizations.

Paladins

A noble and brave knight.

Example: In French 12th century literature the paladins were the king's closest companions.

Colt

A young male horse; in particular one less that 4 years old.

Example: The trainer taught the colt to hold his foot up for a few seconds so he can learn balance.

Royal escort

The soldiers that personally protect the monarch.

Get the truth out of
(someone)

To force somebody to tell the truth.

Example: The mother managed to get the truth out of her child about the broken vase.

Garments

Clothes.

Example: Medieval garments were long and simple compared to the clothes we wear today.

Mismatch

Something that does not go together, a mix of different things.

Example: Today, I'm wearing one red sock and one blue sock. What a mismatch!

Garments

Clothes.

Example: Medieval garments were long and simple compared to the clothes we wear today.

Carry out

To do something.

Example: The students carried out their tasks.

Wandering (wander)

To walk around slowly, not being completely sure where to go.

Example: I was wandering through the supermarket when I accidentally met an old friend.

Distressed

Worried, upset, anxious.

Example: When he saw that he couldn't answer many of the questions on the exam, the student became quite distressed.

Courtesy

Polite behaviour, respect.

Example: It is common courtesy to hold a door open if there is someone close behind you.

Fortress

A castle; a fortified town.

Example: It was impossible to enter the castle; it was a fortress defended from all sides.

Conquer

To defeat (someone); to take control of a place by military force.

Example: Julius Caesar conquered most of Europe.

Refused (refuse)

To say no to something; to indicate that you are not willing to do something.

Example: The children refused to say who had broken the window with a stone.

Ashamed

Feeling self-conscious or embarrassed.

Example: I felt very ashamed when I told my friend that I had talked badly about her behind her back.

Deprive someone of his liberty

To take away someone's liberty; to keep someone prisoner.

Example: The justice system deprives thieves of their liberty when they are convicted of a theft.

Has done no harm (have done no harm)

Have done nothing wrong.

Example: He is such a sweet boy; he would do no harm to anyone.

Boldness

Being brave and courageous.

Example: The team's boldness helped them to succeed.

Begged (beg)

To ask for something in a desperate way; to implore.

Example: The student begged the teacher not to give him 0/10 for cheating.

Dizzy

The feeling that everything is spinning around; feeling unbalanced and light in the head.

Example: After getting off the rollercoaster, I felt very dizzy.

Tree trunk

The woody stem of a tree from which the branches grow.

Example: Planks of wood are cut from the trunk of a tree.

Besiegers

An attacker.

Example: The besiegers spread around the castle strategically, ready to attack.

Pour

To make a liquid (water, oil, ...) flow out of a container (for example, a bottle).

Example: Can I pour you a cup of tea?

Herald

A person who used to make official announcements and carry messages and letters from the monarch.

Example: The king sent out his heralds to let the people in the kingdom know that there would be a big party.

Vigorous

Energetic, powerful.

Example: His handshake was manly and vigorous.

Spurs

A sharp piece of metal which knights wear on the heels of their boots to make their horse go faster by kicking it with it.

Example: The horseman used his spur to make his horse gallop so he could enter the castle before the drawbridge was raised.

Cautiously

Carefully; in a manner that avoids risks.

Example: He drove cautiously because it was dark and raining.

Artefact

An object made by humans to be used as a tool or for decoration.

Example: Some archaeologists have found some interesting artefacts in the Roman ruins.

Bolt

To lock a door by sliding a metal rod/stick into a lock.

Example: It is always smart to bolt the doors at night.

Window ledge

A shelf below a window (either inside or outside).

Example: My cat likes sleeping on the window ledge on a sunny afternoon.

It's a pity

An expression to say that you are disappointed about something.

Example: It's a pity we cannot go to the beach because it is raining.

Machicolations

An opening in a medieval fortification from where stones or boiling oil or water was poured on attackers.

Example: When we went to visit the castle, my little sister amused herself by throwing popcorn through the machicolations.

Spilled (spill)

To drop liquid.

Example: During lunch I spilt water on the table, so I cleaned it before the guests got wet.

Hole

A round opening, an empty space.

Example: There's a hole in my pocket, and all my money fell out.

Kept your nose out of
(keep your nose out of)

A place (in the ground or in a church) where people are buried when they are dead.

An expression, not to interfere in someone else's matters.

Not to get involved in something that is not yours; to tell someone to respect our privacy.

Example: Keep your nose out of my diary! It's private.

Concern

To involve, to have to do with something or someone.

Example: What I write in my diary does not concern you!

Pleased

Happy, content.

Example: He was pleased with his grades this term.